Cool Places: Ungru Manor, Estonia

I have to confess that I didn’t have any idea, how cool would Estonia be. I knew there was mansions and manors, but I had no idea that there were also so many cool abandoned manors and ruins. I may be a very twisted person, but I really love these ruins. I loved them more than I loved the manors.

Here is selected pieces from the net about the manor: “According to rumours, – – count Ewald Adam Gustav Paul Constantin von Ungern-Sternberg had visited the renaissance style castle of Merseburg in Germany in the beginning of the last decade of the 19th century, where he fell in love with the daughter of the castle’s owner. When he proposed to her, the young lady claimed to be so fond of her father’s castle that she promised to stay there for the rest of her life. After that the count in love had promised to build exactly the same castle. Having received a promise from the lady to marry him as soon as the castle is ready, the man hurried back home, where in 1893 the construction begun.

In a couple of years the frame of the house and the roof were ready. Interior works took some longer time and they were almost completed when a message arrived informing about the death of the beloved lady. The count himself fell ill in 1908 during a trip to St.Petersburg where he died as well. According to his wish he was brought back to Haapsalu by train and then carried into the manor, where he spent, though already dead, his only night. Later he was buried in Hiiumaa, to his family’s burial place in Korgessaare.

The mansion was left without an owner and it started to dilapidate due to pillages already during World War I. During Soviet times, an airfield was built nearby. In order to find some hidden treasures and get building materials, the local people and the military destroyed this magnificent building step by step.”

“After World War II the manor fell into the hands of Soviet troops, in 1968 the chief of the airport decided to use the ruins of the manor to fill in the holes in the runway. About one third of the manor was torn down, fortunately the rest was preserved until today. ”

If the story is true, that’s sad and if it’s really true that soviet troops torn down the manor for building material to their secret airfield… well. For my own healthy I don’t continue that sentences. But I say this: I recommend to visit this place, it’s fantastic!

Suomeksi:

Vaikka Viro on täynnä kauniita kartanoita, minä innostuin kaikista eniten mahtavista hylätyistä kartanoista ja niiden raunioista. Yksi näistä ihanuuksista oli Ungru kartano. Tai siis sen rauniot. 

Ungrun kartanolla on suht surullinen tarina taustalla, jos se on tosi. Kartanon rakennuttaja, kreivi Ewald Adam Gustav Paul Constantin von Ungern-Sternberg kävi Merseburgin linnassa, Saksassa ja rakastui linnan omistajan tyttäreen 1890-luvulla. Kun kreivi kosi nuorta neitosta, vaimoehdokas kertoi että hän piti niin paljon isänsä linnasta, että oli vannonut jäävänsä sinne loppuelämäkseen. Rakastunut kreivi lupasi rakentaa tarkan kopion linnasta kotimaahansa ja neito lupautui mennä naimisiin hänen kanssa heti kun linna on valmis. Rakkauden hullannuttama kreivi kiirehti kotiin ja rakentaminen aloitettiin 1893.

Parissa vuodessa talon runko ja katto valmistuivat. Sisätilojen valmistuminen vei kauemmin ja kun ne olivat melkein valmiit, kantautui Saksasta viesti morsiammen kuolemasta. Kreivi itse sairastui ja kuoli 1908 Pietarin reissullaan. Hänen viimeinen toiveensa oli viettää yö kartanossaan. Hän vietti ainoan yönsä jo menehtyneenä kartanossaan. 

Kartano jäi ilman omistajaa ja sen kunto heikkieni ryöstelyn myötä Ensimmäisen maailmansodan aikana. Kun Viro päätyi Neuvostoliiton vallassa, rakennutti Neuvostoliitto 1968 lentokentän lähettyvillä. Lentokenttä itse asiassa näkyy raunoilta. Salaisien aarteiden toivossa ja rakennusmateriaalien takia paikalliset asukkaat ja neuvostosotilaat alkoivat tuhota raunioita. Kartanon tiiliä on käytetty lentokentän kuoppien täyttämiseen. kaiken kaikkiaan yksi kolmas osa kartanosta purettiin aikanaan, mutta loppu on onnistuttu säilyttämään tähän päivään. 

Aivan mahtava paikka, suosittelen!
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Some artsy person has made 1980 Moscow Summer Olympics logo in the side of the tower.

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Ungru manor (in German Linden or Lindenhof) was founded in 1523 when it was separated from Kiltsi manor. In 1629, Swedish king Gustav II Adolf gave the manor to Otto von Ungern-Sternberg as a gift. The first manor house was built in 1630. The baroque building was not as remarkable as the surrounding park that was claimed to have been one of the most beautiful parks in the whole of Estonia. In 1830 Magnus de la Gardie bought the manor. After his death, Evald Ungern-Sternberg bought the manor.

Ungru Manor
According to rumours, his son, count Ewald Adam Gustav Paul Constantin von Ungern-Sternberg had visited the renaissance style castle of Merseburg in Germany in the beginning of the last decade of the 19th century, where he fell in love with the daughter of the castle’s owner. When he proposed to her, the young lady claimed to be so fond of her father’s castle that she promised to stay there for the rest of her life. After that the count in love had promised to build exactly the same castle. Having received a promise from the lady to marry him as soon as the castle is ready, the man hurried back home, where in 1893 the construction begun.

In a couple of years the frame of the house and the roof were ready. Interior works took some longer time and they
were almost completed when a message arrived informing about the death of the beloved lady. The count himself fell ill in 1908 during a trip to St.Petersburg where he died as well. According to his wish he was brought back to Haapsalu by train and then carried into the manor, where he spent, though already dead, his only night. Later he was buried in Hiiumaa, to his family’s burial plase in Korgessaare.

Ungru Manor
The mansion was left without an owner and it started to dilapidate due to pillages already during World War I. During Soviet times, an airfield was built nearby. In order to find some hidden treasures and get building materials, the local people and the military destroyed this magnificent building step by step. Today’s owners have decided to preserve the building as a sightseeing place and take care of its surroundings.

The manor is built from local materials under the supervision of an Estonian master builder A.Saar. E.Schwartz and P.Shubaneyev have been mentioned as architects of the building. The entrance of the building was in the southwestern tower, a staircase led from there to the reception floor with a big ballroom and adjacent play rooms, a dining hall, a wardrobe and salons. The first floor was used for management purposes. The former manor was worth 5 million gold roubles. Some original trees of the manor park have been preserved until today. An oak that is relatively close to the main road is known as Peter’s oak. It was supposedly planted by Peter I or according to another legend, he had his meal under that oak. An old arched bridge of limestone has also been preserved on the road going from the manor towards Haapsalu, the park area reached until there. That is the road that goes past the present dumping ground through Paralepa to a bis stone.

Lähteet:

https://osta-ee.postimees.ee/ungru-mois-laanemaal-9817394.html

https://osta-ee.postimees.ee/en/ungru-loss-j-grunthal-haapsalu-4149046.html

https://register.muinas.ee/public.php?menuID=monument&action=view&id=15589

http://www.Pinterest.com

http://www.aviastar.org/travel/estonia/ungru.html

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